Bodies, Technologies, Objects

Please mark your calendars for the Medical Humanities showcase

‘Bodies, Technologies, Objects’

organized by MedHumLab Manchester

Tuesday, 6 September 2016
10am – 4.30pm
Grand Hall, The Whitworth, Manchester

Plenary speaker: Dr Sam Alberti, Keeper of Science and Technology, National Museums Scotland, Edinburgh

Binaural stethoscopes, with two rubber tubes, substituted monaural ones in the early 1900s

Binaural stethoscope, Museum of Medicine and Health, Manchester

The workshop will also include an artist-led session, and  a session on ‘Teaching and Engagement’ featuring Dr Kostas Arvanitis (Centre for Museology) and Stephanie Seville (Museum of Medicine and Health).

More info to follow soon!

Bedrock: exhibition of new artwork by Nicola Dale

Do you remember the workshop From Coal Mining to Data Mining we held in November? We are now inviting you to attend the opening of the exhibition associated with this project, of Nicola Dale‘s artwork inspired by historical arthritis research with coal miners as research subjects and by conversations with former miners.

21 January, 6-8pm (exhibition continues till 24 January)
ArtWork Atelier, 95 Greengate, Salford M3 7NG (entrance on Queen Street, about 5-10 minutes walk from Manchester Cathedra)

Here is a map

And here is an invitation on Nicola’s own blog site, with some interesting links.

Bedrock Poster

Download the poster (pdf)

Events at the Whitworth

Happy New Year to you all from the Medical Humanities Lab. Lab member Wendy Gallagher asked us to let you know about the following events held at the Whitworth Art Gallery.

Coffee, Cake and Culture

Making culture accessible to people living with dementia and their carers

Fully supported museum visits for people with dementia and their family members or care partners, on Thursdays the 28 January, 25 February, 31 March, 28 April and 26 May, from 2 to 4pm. Attendance free.

Coffee_cake_andCulture A4 online Dec2015[3]

Aesthetics of Anatomy

Life drawing classes in the study of anatomy. Last Thursday of every month, £5 per session – all materials provided. Book your sessions here.

Aesthetics Classes Online Dec2015

For more information, please contact wendy.gallagher@manchester.ac.uk

 

 

Not so grim up north: how can museums contribute to health and wellbeing?

The Whitworth Art Gallery and Manchester Museum are part of a new Arts Council funded research project looking at the impact of engaging in museum activities for individuals’ health and wellbeing. Not So Grim Up North (2015-2018) is a collaboration with Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums (TWAM), working with researchers at University College London (UCL).

The Whitworth and TWAM have been leading creative work in the field of health, culture and wellbeing for many years, with specifically developed arts and heritage programmes in partnership with local healthcare and social care services. Inspired by the collections of art and local history, the programmes offer behind-the-scenes tours and object handling; arts activities; sound recording; creative writing; and photography.

JCF8679-copy

The Whitworth’s contemporary textiles handling resource

The research will explore how taking part in a museum or art gallery activity can have demonstrable health and wellbeing outcomes, through a longitudinal study using a mix-methods approach – that is, we will be using validated (quantitative) clinical scales alongside qualitative interviews to measure the impact of these activities over 18 months. The project will work with a range of audiences across the two regions, including adults with mental health issues, adults in addiction recovery, stroke rehabilitation patients, and older adults living with dementia; and will also bring together the perspectives of healthcare professionals and cultural professionals to explore the work of partnership. The project will contribute to better understanding the value of museum encounters on health and wellbeing.

Dr Nuala Morse is the Research Associate for the project, based at the Whitworth Art Gallery, University of Manchester. Nuala’s background crosses human geography, museum studies, participatory theory and the medical humanities, and her work is interested in the distinctive nature of the ‘social work’ of museums professionals; the role of the museum as a space of social care; and the role of culture in (mental health and addictions) recovery work. Nuala’s recent papers can be found here.

You can find out more about the research project here (please note some of these pages are under construction).

If you would like any further information please contact Nuala: Nuala.morse@manchester.ac.uk

Find out more about the museums’ programmes: